Bright Ugochukwu Eke

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For one month in 2007, the Djerassi Resident Artists Program in the USA hosted artist Bright Ugochukwu Eke from Nigeria

About Djerassi Resident Artist Program

Now in its 28th year, the Djerassi Resident Artists Program is internationally recognized as one of the eminent artist residency programs. We strive to provide the best possible residency experience for artists of superior talent from a diverse range of backgrounds and geographical locations.

As stewards of a unique and beautiful property, we also seek to preserve the land and use our facilities wisely and efficiently for maximum benefit to the artists and with the least impact on the environment. 

 

From Djerassi Resident Artist Program

Nigerian environmental artist Bright Ugochukwu Eke created a new permanent installation for the Djerassi Resident Artist Program’s outdoor sculpture collection during his residency in July 2007. The installation is comprised of forty large-scale fish carved from redwood shards, stained black, and suspended in a large California oak tree. Hanging from each fish are small plastic bags filled with oil, signifying the pollution that plagues the rivers and landscape in Eke’s homeland. During his residency, Eke also gave a talk at the Palo Alto Art Center about his new installation and his environmental concerns.

 

From Bright Ugochukwu Eke

“Five weeks out here in isolation doing only critical thinking, ideas and experimentation was a really great leap in my creative preview….all that walking along the trails, through the woods and around the ranch, the sight of those magnificent mountains, and when I saw myself moving in the chill of that fog...oh! it was a soul-body dialogue.” 

About Bright Ugochukwu Eke 

Born in 1976 in Mbaise, Imo State, Nigeria, Bright Ugochukwu Eke attended the University of Nsukka and received a BA in Fine Arts. Eke focuses on the total disregard for the environment not only by the authorities but also by individuals who litter their communities indiscriminately. In the installation Acid Rain, he creates water (rain) droplets containing a blackish industrial chemical similar to acid rain. Shield consists of raincoats and umbrellas made of water sachets to protect from the toxic effects of acid rain. His personal experience of acid rain occurred whilst working in the rain in a polluted area. The result was skin irritation caused by the toxicity of the rain. In these two works the artist highlights how industrialization especially in developing countries and specifically in the oil producing areas of Nigeria has caused the decimation of the natural environment.

Nigerian environmental artist Bright Ugochukwu Eke created a new permanent installation for the Djerassi Resident Artist Program’s outdoor sculpture collection during his residency in July 2007. The installation is comprised of forty large-scale fish carved from redwood shards, stained black, and suspended in a large California oak tree. Hanging from each fish are small plastic bags filled with oil, signifying the pollution that plagues the rivers and landscape in Eke’s homeland. During his residency, Eke also gave a talk at the Palo Alto Art Center about his new installation and his environmental concerns.