2012 May Res Artis Newsletter

New 'Just us Members' Facebook Group



We’ve now mostly populated our brand new Facebook Group, just for members of Res Artis. We hope this will be a comfortable way for members to connect, sharing stories, successes, difficulties and new ideas. It's a private forum where we can talk about 'residency stuff' among ourselves.

(If you are a Res Artis member, use Facebook and are not already in the group, please send a message to julie@resartis.org)


ResSupport Fellowships
Colombia to Germany, Peru/Brazil to USA



Adriana Maria Pineda
, visual artist and curator from Medellín, Colombia was a ResSupport Fellow at Akademie Schloss Solitude in Stuttgart, Germany, from 24th November 2011–15th January 2012. She was chosen from a list generated by Res Artis for Schloss Solitude.

In order to familiarize her with the work of the Akademie, she was involved in the general organization of the space as well as with specific cultural projects with the Solitude fellows, administrative work, and a diverse range of internal activities. In addition, Pineda conducted interviews with the staff about their work, visited the studios and interviewed the current resident artists (30), participated in a symposium, and attended the shared dinners. She also had the chance to visit partner institutions in Stuttgart.

Giuseppe De Bernardi from Tupac, Centro de Creación Contemporánea, Peru, and Francisca Caporali, JA.CA Art and Technology Center, Brazil, are currently enjoying their ResSupport Fellowship at the 18th Street Arts Center in Los Angeles.

More information about ResSupport Fellowships: here

 

Crisis? Greek Residencies tell their story



How has the crisis affected your residency?

  • Because of the nature of the residency and the involvement of the Medea Collective we where fortunate to be able to plan 2012-2013 with out any major problems. The final outcome will be presented this year (Like in 2011) at Onassis cultural center, which is a countable help. (Medea Electronique / Koumaria Residency)
  • We limited the residencies we offer from 10 down to 4 per year and we decided not to offer new ones before the end of 2012. (KINITIRAS Studio Artistic Residency Centre)
  • The Greek crisis has mainly affected the Americans that we deal with. The uprisings that happen in Athens are in a very isolated area, but to Americans the impression is it is all over. As we know, the news tends to exaggerate situations and it has really hurt Greek tourism. We have found that Americans have been skittish about traveling and the unfortunate part is prices are dropping so this is the time to travel to Greece! Europeans are much more used to these types of situations so it doesn't seem to affect them as much. (The Skopelos Foundation for the Arts)


How have you addressed the crisis?

  • We created a program called "Artists with Crisis" (crisis in Greek meaning wise thinking) and we offer workshops in really low prices and opportunities for performances of young artists through competitions and festivals. (KINITIRAS Studio Artistic Residency Centre)
  • In ‘times of crises’ the art community needs vision and collective art movements can play a vital role in unifying the art scene. Art projects that could really affect our society are left aside. In times in which independent art could play the most vital role in educating, informing and entertaining our society, its importance is vastly undermined by the popular news media and governmental politics. For that reason, Medea Electronique still insists and persists to make collective art projects with limited or no funding in order to be able to maintain an independent collective arts scene. Medeas main venue this year is again Koumaria Residency. (Medea Electronique / Koumaria Residency)
  • In a positive way, by establishing innovative projects into our main international program and Festival. (Ionion Center for the Arts & Culture)
  • We are trying to help the crisis but supporting the Skopelos community through free workshops for students and giving a boost to the local artisans. For instance a very large article will be coming out in the May issue of Ceramics Monthly about Nikos Rodios, a local third-generation ceramist that creates beautiful black pottery through traditional techniques; his family was instrumental in reviving the ancient Greek forms. (The Skopelos Foundation for the Arts)

 

Assessing Assessment:
The First In a Series of Meetings on Assessment and Residencies

 

The first in a series of discussions on the role of assessment in the field of residencies was held on May 3-7 at the Rockefeller Foundation’s Bellagio Center. The gathering was a collaborative project between Res Artis, the Alliance of Artists Communities, and The Rockefeller Foundation. Conversations ranged from looking at the specific relationship between approaches to assessment and the promotion of creativity to wider questions about the values we share as organizations that help to define the field of art residencies.

The participants included: James Baker (Pilchuck Glass School,) Mary Ann DeVlieg (International Network of Contemporary Performing Arts,) Suzanne Fetscher (McColl Center for Visual Art,) Robert Frankel Director of Museums and Visual Arts, National Endowment for the Arts,) Karol Frühauf (Bridge Guard Residential Art,) Stanford Makishi (Asian Cultural Council,) Roger Mandle (Qatar Museums Authority,) Tanner Methvin (The Africa Centre,) Marge Myers (The STUDIO for Creative Inquiry,) Robert Picciotto (European Evaluation Society,) Johan Pousette (Nordic Ministers Culture,) Regina Smith (The Kresge Foundation,) Risë Wilson (Leveraging Investments in Creativity,) Cheryl Young (The MacDowell Colony,) Maria Tuerlings (TransArtists.)

We are particularly grateful to Caitlin Strokosch, the Executive Director of the Alliance of Artists Communities, for her hard work in helping to put together an excellent program, and, of course, to Rob Garris, Managing Director of Bellagio Programs, for his foresight in providing the opportunity for the field to begin to methodically engage these issues. We look forward to continuing this conversation at our General Meeting in Tokyo and at the annual conference of the Alliance of Artists Communities later this year. We plan on compiling a publication of these conversations as they continue to develop so we look forward to your input.


Variations: Residencies with exhibitions II
The case of ONDARTE, Mexico


 

  • How is the exhibition curated?
    The monthly exhibition programmed for our artists in residence is curated by Alec Von Bargen, artist, curator and founder of ONDARTE. Together with the residency director, Maribel Bianchi, they work closely with the artists to find a commonplace amongst the work created in order to produce a show of quality for the attending public. The common studio space is transformed for one night into a makeshift gallery hosting up to 500 guests who can sometimes travel over 100 miles to view the artists work. Every month the exhibition space is completely transformed in order to create the most appealing proposal possible.
  • What do you see is the advantage of having an exhibition as part of a residency period?
    Attending a residency is always a positive way to force ourselves as artists to think outside of the box and to work distant from our comfort zones. Having the opportunity to show the work in a 'gallery' setting at the end of a residency forces the artists to produce with a purpose beyond the simple 'let's see what happens'. Our artists know upon acceptance what date their show or shows will be and this way they begin the residency already knowing their deadline. This provokes an extra enthusiasm amongst the participants and creates a stronger commitment to the program itself. During our monthly exhibitions some of our artists have managed to sell their pieces, they've made contacts which continue once they arrive back home, they've managed to collaborate with other artists, and they receive honest feedback from an audience which is not one typically familiar with their work. It's a win-win situation for all.
  • What are the difficulties?
    The difficulties are trying to make everyone happy; after all we are a residency program and not a gallery. The lighting may not be just perfect, or the wall space the artist desires has already been allocated to another artist . . . the exact same issues one would have in any other group show. ONDARTE's personal difficulties would be the fact that we are in the middle of the Mayan jungle with the closest city about 30 minutes away. Artists can find it hard to find the exact materials they seek for the presentation or even the creation of their pieces. Otherwise, you'd be surprised how well artists work together when they want to present something as professional as possible. We offer that here and the results have been astounding.

 

New Residency: index-residency-atelier, Switzerland

  • Where is it?
    The index-residency-atelier is located in the heart of Zürich with access to a roof terrace with great view onto lake and town.
  • What is it?
    Free residency in Zürich, with possibilities to exchange with the index-artists-collective and, if wished, to show/expose your work.
  • Whats going on now?
    For current events and individual projects of index-members: www.wortundwirkung.ch
  • index Freiraum arists in resience on the Res Artis webpage