Deadline: 30/11/2016

ArquetopiaSUMMER 2017 Special International Summer Program - Puebla, Southern Mexico

Special 3-in-1 International Summer Academic Program Includes Novohispanic Graphic Arts Instruction.

ArquetopiaSUMMER 2017
SPECIAL 3-IN-1 INTERNATIONAL SUMMER ACADEMIC PROGRAMINCLUDES NOVOHISPANIC GRAPHIC ARTS TECHNIQUE INSTRUCTION AND SELF-DIRECTED ART PRODUCTION

Program Session Dates: June 5 to July 17, 2017
Apply Now through Wednesday, November 30
Our committee processes all residency applications when they are received vs. after the deadline has passed. NOTE: For applicants selected from this deadline, our Board offers a significant Fee Reduction for optional early payment. 

E-mail Chris at info@arquetopia.org 

NEW! Full Program Itinerary and
Schedule of Events Posted Below

Arquetopia’s flagship residency program: ArquetopiaSUMMER 2017 will focus on the relationship between individual art practices and the visual history of violence. How is the discourse of violence institutionalized? How is violence affecting art production systems and influencing art markets? How has violence become an important part of the visual history of Mexico? How is the normalization of violence through aesthetic principles critical to understand intention and representation?

ArquetopiaSUMMER 2017 Special International Summer Academic Program (with Novohispanic Graphic Arts and Mural Art technique instruction, and self-directed Art Production) is a prestigious 6-week critical program that offers competitive professional opportunities for local and international emerging and mid-career artists, curators, art historians, and students age 23 and over.

This unique program offers critical methodologies to diverse art practices, exploring how violence is constructed through the language of aesthetics. The goal is to provide tools to understand visualities and gestures in art, while identifying institutional trivilization of intention, and representation in visual expression. Through the program, participants will conceptualize their art by engaging their practice in critical discussions. One of the central goals is to contextualize historical and contemporary articulations regarding the language of visual violence. The seminars and tours included in the program will explore the role of aesthetics in the construction of Mexico’s visual history and its categorization in the context of global visual culture. The program will also put into context the role of cultural institutions, such as museums and galleries, in the production of meaning through objects, social relations, and art consumption. Through hands-on workshops in collaboration with the Museum of Art of the Former Convent of Santa Monica, participants will have the opportunity to expand their art practice by exploring the artistic connections between the baroque graphic arts and the Novohispanic mural painting tradition.

ArquetopiaSUMMER 2017 PROGRAM INCLUSIONS
This program includes 27 seminar hours; 9 hours of individual and collective critiques; guided tours and visits to prominent museums in Puebla, independent galleries, and relevant sites. The program also includes a 27-hour hands-on art workshop instructed by a master conservator, exploring the artistic dimensions of the baroque printmaking tradition and Novohispanic mural art techniques. Activities are designed to promote intense creative work and artistic dialogue; therefore, artists are expected to allocate self-directed studio hours as part of their weekly schedule. Renowned international art historians, artists, and master restorers facilitate the dialogues, individual and collective critiques, seminars, and workshops. Seminars are conducted in English. Workshop instruction is in Spanish or English. Participants produce work in our partnered studio at one of Mexico’s most important art museums, in Puebla’s majestic central historic district

ArquetopiaSUMMER 2017 SPECIAL GUEST SCHOLARS AND INSTRUCTORS

Kirsten Pai Buick
, Ph.D. specializes in American art, focusing her research on African-American art, the impact of race and gender on the history of art, representations of the American landscape, and the history of women as patrons and collectors of the arts. She has advanced scholarship of the work of numerous African-American artists through publications including the first book-length examination of the life and career of 19th-century sculptor Mary Edmonia Lewis. Buick is a tenured, full professor at the University of New Mexico, where she has taught for more than 15 years. She earned her bachelor's degree in art history and Italian literature in 1985 from the University of Chicago. She earned her master's and doctorate degrees in art history from the University of Michigan. Buick has published extensively on African-American art. Her book Child of the Fire: Mary Edmonia Lewis and the Problem of Art History's Black and Indian Subject was published by Duke University Press, and her second book, In Authenticity: 'Kara Walker' and the Eidetics of Racism, is currently in progress. Her published articles include studies on the work of artists including Daniel Coburn, Patrick Nagatani, Joseph Delaney, Aaron Douglas, Horace Pippin, and Kehinde Wiley. Buick has earned numerous academic, professional, and scholarly awards and grants including the Driskell Prize, Smithsonian American Art Museum's Predoctoral Fellowship, the Charles Gaius Bolin Fellowship at Williams College, CAA Professional Development Fellowship in Art History, Rhoades Foundation Visiting Lectureship, and the UNM University Libraries Faculty Acknowledgement Award.

Annette Rodríguez, Ph.D. received her doctorate in American Studies at Brown University in 2016. In 2015, Rodríguez was presented the 18th annual Catherine Prelinger Award by the Coordinating Council for Women in History for her scholarly and professional contributions to women in history, and for educating young women to pursue careers in the historical profession. In July of 2016, Rodríguez was selected as a winner of the Dixon First Amendment Award for her efforts on behalf of students, faculty and staff in New Mexico higher education. She has previously been selected as a National Graduate Fellow by the Law and Society Association, a Latino Museum Studies Program Fellow at the Smithsonian Institute, the George I. Sanchez Fellow at the Center for Southwest Research, and a Graduate Fellow at the Office of the New Mexico State Historian. Rodríguez has acted as an instructor at Brown University, the University of New Mexico, Northern New Mexico College, and Santa Fe Community College. She concentrates her work on perennial racist violences in the United States as communicating events that construct and reinforce ideologies and hierarchies of race, gender, citizenship, and national belonging.

Francisco Guevara is a visual artist and curator specializing in creating projects using contemporary art to promote Development by designing alternative models of social entrepreneurship for human development. He graduated with the degree of University Expert in Management and Planning of Development Cooperation Projects in the Fields of Education, Science and Culture from the Universidad Nacional de Estudios a Distancia (UNED) in Madrid, Spain, in coordination with the Organization of Latin American States for Education, Science and Culture (OEI). He also received his postgraduate degree in Cultural Management and Communication from the Latin American Faculty of Social Sciences (FLACSO) in Buenos Aires, Argentina. He joined the Race, Gender and the Historiographies of Art Seminar at the University of New Mexico in 2009 to incorporate into his curatorial projects a broader understanding of identity in the local and international context. His work and projects emphasize the role of contemporary art practices as a tool for social change. His experience covers international projects including: intangible heritage, public art, exhibits and visual arts education. As an artist he has researched, studied and worked exploring the connection between food, rituals of eating and collective identity. He is Co-Founder and Co-Executive Director of Arquetopia Foundation for Development.

Emmanuel Ortega is a curator and a doctoral candidate in Ibero-American colonial art history at the University of New Mexico. He is an adjunct instructor in the Department of Art and Art History at the University of Nevada Las Vegas. Since 2007, he has investigated images of violence in the Novohispanic context. For his master thesis, Ortega investigated images involving public performances organized by the Novohispanic Inquisition. For his Ph.D. dissertation, Ortega researches visual representations of the New Mexico Pueblo peoples in Novohispanic Franciscan martyr paintings. He has contributed several entries for the Khan Academy website and the Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies online bulletin. He has presented his work in the XXXVI Annual Colloquium of Art History organized by the Universidad Autonoma de Mexico, 2012, the College of Art Association and American Studies Association in 2015. Also, in 2015, Ortega partnered with the Museo de Arte Religioso Ex-Convento de Santa Mónica in Puebla, México to curate two art exhibitions based on recently restored paintings from the museum's permanent collection. 

ArquetopiaSUMMER 2017 PROGRAM ITINERARY AND SCHEDULE OF EVENTS

Week 1
The first week of the program will serve as an introduction to Arquetopia’s methodologies. We will welcome art historian Dr. Annette Rodríguez, who will teach the first seminar exploring how violence constructs and reinforces ideologies and heirarchies of race, gender, citizenship, and national belonging. This first week will include self-directed art production hours and an introduction to historical and artistic connections between Novohispanic graphic arts and mural painting traditions. In addition, individual art critique sessions will help participants establish overall goals. The first tour of Mapping the City will focus on ritualized violence.

  • Seminar with Annette Rodríguez (9 hours)
  • Self-directed art production time (12 hours, approx.)
  • Introduction to Novohispanic Graphic Arts and mural painting traditions (9 hours)
  • Individual art critique
  • Mapping the City: Ritualized Violence

Week 2
The second week will focus on the diversity of art practices, collective critique, and in the assessment of conceptual needs for each individual project. Furthermore, we will be sourcing out materials for production. For this reason, the time allocated for self-directed art production will be increased during this week, allowing participants an exploration of their themes and projects independently. Art instruction is included in the second week, which will place a particular emphasis on Novohispanic Graphic Arts techniques. Lastly, the second Mapping the City tour will focus on violence through visual culture.

  • Self-directed art production time (18 hours, approx.)
  • Novohispanic Graphic Arts Techniques Workshop (9 hours)
  • Collective art critique
  • Mapping the City: Violence through Visual Culture

Week 3
During the third week, we will introduce participants to the complex mural tradition reflecting an amalgam of art techniques that produced a very rich visual culture. Studio hours will remain the same, allowing artists to continue their production. Art instruction will focus on Novohispanic mural painting techniques, and individual critiques will allow participants to assess their progress. Mapping the City will focus on exploring the Mesoamerican and Novohispanic mural tradition, including Cholula and Casa del Dean.

  • Self-directed art production (18 hours, approx.)
  • Novohispanic Mural Painting Techniques Workshop (9 hours)
  • Individual critique
  • Mapping the City: Exploring the Mural Tradition

Week 4
The fourth week will focus on contemporary art case studies as examples of discourse on violence and its normalization in art. Studio hours will continue the same, while collective critique will serve as feedback for the individual art practices. Mapping the City will focus on Mexico and Puebla’s contemporary art scene, including studio visits and an artist talk.

  • Self-directed art production (18 hours, approx.)
  • Collective critique
  • Mapping the City: Contemporary Violence

Week 5
For the fifth week, we will welcome art historian Emmanuel Ortega who will teach a seminar on violence and the stratification of artistic practices. With the main purpose of challenging hierarchies that negatively impact the production of art and art history to this day, the seminar will also focus on the construction of national identity. This seminar also includes guided visits to relevant sites in order to further contextualize colonial art practices. Participants will continue to produce in the studio and have individual critiques. The activities and tours will include baroque architecture and other relevant sites.

  • Seminar with Emmanuel Ortega
  • Self-directed art production (18 hours, approx.)
  • Individual critique
  • Mapping the City: Violence and National Identity

Week 6
For the sixth and final week, we will welcome art historian Dr. Kirsten Buick, who will teach a master class on the aesthetics of violence and the writing of art history. Through a series of case studies, participants will explore how artists, art historians, critics, and the public construct meaning through objects and how we frame, at various times race, gender, sexuality, and class through visual expression. For the final critique, participants will present the results of their residency and collectively review the diverse processes. A farewell dinner for all ArquetopiaSUMMER 2017 participants will be held during this week.

  • Master class with Kirsten Buick
  • Self-directed art production (18 hours, approx.)
  • Final collective critique
  • Farewell dinner

ArquetopiaSUMMER 2017 SPECIAL VENUE
The Museum of Art of the Former Convent of Santa Monica is one of Mexico’s most prominent religious and colonial art museums. Its collections were formed in the 1930s with artwork from the 16th through 17th centuries including some of the greatest artists of the New Spain such as Juan Correa, Miguel Cabrera, Miguel Jerónimo de Zendejas, and Lorenzo Zendejas, among others. The museum also records monastic life in different periods of history, from everyday life to religious rituals.

OUR ARTIST-IN-RESIDENCE PROGRAMS
Arquetopia is distinguished worldwide for its array of unique residency programs with substantial content. In contrast to various property rental schemes, tourist resorts, B&B’s, and sublets elsewhere, our residency spaces function exclusively for productive art professionals, writers, and researchers and include structured, informative programs; a network of collaborative workspaces, institutions, and studios; and individualized project support.Our programs are based on a non-exploitative model promoting social consciousness. Residents are strongly encouraged to explore various ways of cultural exchange as part of their artistic and/or research goals and to actively engage in critical discussions as part of their residency experience. As Arquetopia’s mission is to promote social transformation, understanding Mexico’s context, and specifically Puebla and Oaxaca’s cultural complexity, is key for a successful cultural exchange. We welcome art professionals and students from diverse backgrounds and disciplines who are interested in creating work inspired by art, elements, techniques or processes that are specific to Mexico and/or unique to Puebla or Oaxaca.

Our residency programs are process-oriented, and the core of the residency is a critical approach to artmaking, learning, and research. Our staff and board of directors have designed a curriculum for the residency programs that facilitates a critical dialogue between the artist’s practice and the context encountered. In order to challenge stereotypes and preconceived notions of Latin America, all programs include an introduction to the complexity of Mexican identities with a focus in the artists’ project scope and artistic goals.Artists-in-residence are introduced to a better understanding of Mexico’s Mesoamerican and colonial past, its modern present, and while producing, they learn to challenge contemporary art and what are considered traditional art practices; therefore, Arquetopia aids this process with a series of weekly individual meetings, discussion, critiques, and a critical bibliography that are tailored to each artist’s needs. The ultimate goal is for artists to learn new methods and techniques while questioning their own practice in the hopes of extending the critical discussion to other communities.

RESIDENCY GUIDELINES
• Selection decisions are based on artistic work and proposed project. Applicants at all stages of their careers (emerging and established) must demonstrate a clear sense of potential.
• Our pool of applicants and residents is diverse in all aspects.
• Our residency programs are competitive opportunities for artists and researchers to pursue their own work, free of pressure (especially work that in their particular circumstances would normally be difficult to produce).
• Selection priority is given to projects that explore a responsible connection between the applicant’s artistic practice and the cultural context of Mexico, of Puebla, or of Oaxaca. The connection can be as broad as an artistic technique or as specific as a local theme.
• The creation of community with fellow artists and staff during the residency period is important.

ARQUETOPIA
Founded in 2009, Arquetopia is an international award-winning, Mexican official nonprofit foundation for visual arts, music, literature, and research. Run entirely by artists, Arquetopia’s programs promote development and social transformation through contemporary art with a nontraditional, culturally diverse and multidisciplinary approach. Arquetopia’s resident artist and staff backgrounds are diverse in all aspects.

PUEBLA, SOUTHERN MEXICO
Accessible via two international airports in Puebla (PBC) and Mexico City (MEX), Puebla is a UNESCO World Heritage Site that lies 136 km (84 mi) from Mexico City and has approximately 5,000 colonial buildings. With a population of 2.7 million, Puebla is famous for a deep cultural identity, delicious cuisine, Talavera ceramics, and traditions rooted in the 16th-century baroque and enriched by a blend of five pre-Hispanic/indigenous cultures, Arab, Jewish, French, and Spanish influences. Puebla lies 45 km (28 mi) east of the Popocatépetl and Iztaccíhuatl volcanoes, giving the residents a magnificent view of their snow-topped peaks. At an elevation of 2,200 m (7,200 ft), Puebla features a temperate subtropical highland climate, resulting in an average of only three days per year seeing temperatures above 29°C (84°F). Puebla is also ideally located close to several other important cities: only two hours to spectacular Mexico City, three hours to the sunny beaches of Veracruz, and four and a half hours to historic Oaxaca, each easily accessible via cheap and comfortable charter bus from Puebla. Lonely Planet, the world’s largest travel guidebook and digital media publisher, announced that Puebla made its Readers'  Choice Top 10 "Best in Travel" list for 2012. After hundreds of nominations for cities, countries and regions, we are proud that Puebla was voted by experienced travelers to the Top 10 alongside such destinations as Barcelona, Reykjavik, Berlin, Istanbul and Bangkok.

A New York Times article named Puebla as #13 of the "45 Places to Go in 2012," and The San Francisco Chronicle recently named Puebla as one of the top five safest places in Mexico for travelers.

ARQUETOPIA PUEBLA ARTIST RESIDENCY SPACE 
New as of 2015: A spectacular, four-story 1939 Colonial Mexican California-style compound conveniently located in Puebla’s central historic district and close to the Zócalo (city square) accommodates the offices, residency space for up to 12 artists-in-residence, and numerous production spaces of Arquetopia. Recently renovated and expanded, the residency offers a large, natural-light studio/gallery; an equipped darkroom; a medium-sized gas kiln (about 2X2X2 ft. interior chamber); a natural pigments laboratory; a research library; ten furnished bedrooms; a large dining room; an open-access kitchen; furnished outdoor terraces and viewing decks; and a rooftop lounge with panoramic views of the city.

RESIDENCY DURATION / TIME PERIOD
Term of 6 weeks. Dates for this program are fixed, from Monday, June 5 to Monday, July 17, 2017.

WHAT THIS RESIDENCY INCLUDES

Staff Support:

  • Each resident meets weekly with our staff for individualized research assistance/resources, project guidance, and critiques
  • Our residencies are process-based; residents are not expected to give talks, exhibitions, or workshops

Accommodation and Meals:

  • Furnished, private bedroom
  • Meals and 24-hour access to the kitchen and dining room
  • Wireless Internet
  • Use of Arquetopia’s residency spaces including 4th-floor lounge and outdoor terraces
  • Shared bathrooms with modern fixtures and showers
  • Housekeeping

Studio Workspace:

  • 24-hour access to large and bright, shared art studio with generous natural light
  • Personal workspace with large table and wall space
  • Some tools provided
  • Equipped darkroom provided for photographers
  • Materials and supplies for the instructional course provided
  • Materials and supplies for additional project production not included but available for purchase locally

RESIDENCY DEPOSIT, FEE, AND PAYMENT DEADLINES
Fee: USD $795 per week (USD $4770 total for the 6 weeks).
Payment Deadlines: Option 1. Deposit of 20% of Residency Fee due within 2 weeks of selection. Balance of Residency Fee due by 60 days prior to residency start date. Option 2. Deposit of 10% of Residency Fee due within 2 weeks of selection. Balance of Residency Fee due by 90 days prior to residency start date.

HOW TO APPLY
Visit the Arquetopia website at www.arquetopia.org

Complete and submit the Arquetopia Artist-in-Residence Online Application Form, following the instructions on the web page.

Following selection, applicants are notified immediately via e-mail.

Arquetopia is committed to providing an inclusive and welcoming environment for all members of our diverse local and international community. Arquetopia’s resident artist and staff backgrounds vary in all aspects. As part of Arquetopia’s mission is to promote diversity, Arquetopia actively fights discrimination by offering access to its programs and activities without regard to race, color, gender or gender expression, national origin, age, religion, creed, or sexual orientation.

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ArquetopiaSUMMER 2017 Special International Summer Program - Puebla, Southern Mexico

ArquetopiaSUMMER 2017 Special International Summer Program - Puebla, Southern Mexico

Location
Mexico

Application deadline
30/11/2016

Residency starts
05/06/2017

Residency ends
17/07/2017

More information
http://www.arquetopia.org/our-artist-residencies/arquetopia-summer-2017

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arquetopiasummer_2017.pdf
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